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Voice assistants are among the most practical ways to connect with IoT devices, particularly if you're cooking or away from your phone. Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant interact with a wide range of devices, allowing you to control them all without having to worry about which bulb or socket is compatible with which platform.

 

However, speaking isn't always the greatest option. Your "smart" speaker could not comprehend what you're saying, or you might prefer not to utilize Google Assistant. If you have a collection of smart lights and other gadgets from several companies, maintaining them all via various applications may rapidly become a headache. To make your life simpler, we've compiled a list of the top applications for controlling your home's connected gadgets.

 

The Best Android Apps for 2022

 

Google's "Home" App

With the Google Home app, you don't need to use any additional software to control a wide range of smart home devices. It's nice that all of your Assistant-enabled devices show up in the app without any additional settings. Each device may be controlled from a single screen, eliminating the need to individually add each one to the program.

 

Even if they're interoperable with Assistant and shown in the app, certain gadgets can't be controlled by Google Home. As an example, even though I can request Google to turn off the TV through the Google Home app, there is no way to do so. Good app design services now make smart apps integrated with Google home.

 

 

Amazon Alexa

Similar to Google's app, Amazon gives the option to control and organize your gadgets into rooms. Because it's capable of a wide array of goods and services, it also has the advantage of being cost-effective.

 

Alexa has icons for turning off all the lights and plugs in a tap in each room. Because it doesn't understand smart plugs, it can't identify bulbs that have been attached to them. You won't be able to turn on all the lights in your living room if you press the symbol to do so, because they're all connected to smart plugs.

 

There is no shortcut to control your smart devices, even if the app has a widget. Also, every time you launch an app, you must tap on Devices. You may not like it, especially if you want to use the app as an intelligent remote for your phone or tablet.

 

 

SmartThings by Samsung

On this list, SmartThings is one of the most visually appealing apps. Despite the fact that it's developed by Samsung, this app isn't limited to Samsung devices, and it doesn't necessitate the use of a central hub.

 

Setup is a breeze, and the software can be used to divide devices by room. Lighting timers can also be configured to turn off after a predetermined period of time or at a predetermined time. It is possible to set up several locations in the app as well.

 

Most significantly, it lets you add widgets to your home screen, making it much handier for you to utilize. Because several settings are poorly constructed, this app is difficult to use on a regular basis as a driver.

 

 

Olisto App

In essence, Olisto isn't a control panel in the traditional sense, but rather a tool to automate and connect most of your smart home gadgets and appliances. For example, you may build "Triggs" based on the time or place to do certain tasks. As an example, you may instruct the system to turn on the lights, lock the doors, and open the blinds at 9:00 AM every weekday.

 

Other gadgets in your home, such as your smart camera or fitness tracker, may be used to automate operations. Your kitchen door can be locked if you haven't exercised enough before 7:00 PM thanks to the vast range of services that Olisto integrates with.

 

 

iHaus App

iHaus isn't the most visually appealing software out there, but it's quite helpful. Makes it possible to connect to your smart home products without logging onto third-party services without requiring considerable setup. When I opened the app, it discovered my Roomba and Hue lights were already linked to my Wi-Fi network and I only had to press a button. Sadly, because my plugs and cast-capable speakers were not supported, I was unable to use the app with everything I own.

 

In contrast to Olisto, the iHaus app is more of a control panel for your smart devices such as speakers and lights as well as plugs and kitchen appliances. A single press of a device icon will switch it on or start it; this makes it easier to operate than Google Home. Another nice feature is the ability to switch on all the lights in a room at once, or change their color simultaneously, thanks to the ability to detect groupings of lights (such as Hue rooms).

 

 

Yonomi App

Similar to Olisto, Yonomi Yonomi helps you automate your daily tasks at home, just as the latter. In addition, it serves as a remote control for lighting and other appliances. Like iHaus, it's simple to set up and can instantly identify what devices are connected to your Wi-Fi network. However, groups are not supported. Despite the fact that you may manage individual applications, you cannot switch many lights on or off simultaneously.

 

The conditional nature of procedures means that Yonomi could be beneficial in this context. There aren't as many supported services as there are with Olisto or IFTTT, so you'll have to decide if it's useful to you.

 

 

IFTTT App

Last but not the least, IFTTT is a service we like a lot. You may forget it exists once everything is in place. For example, if you have many smart plugs in your house to control your lights and don't want to go through different applications to turn them off when you leave, IFTTT can assist. Simply add all of the plugs to the app and generate a recipe depending on location. In fact, IFTTT is so efficient that you seldom need to use it unless you're configuring a new applet or reviewing your activity log.